Lannin Presents Work Characterizing Electrical Properties of Cancer Cells at AiCHE/AES 2015 Annual Meeting

I recently presented my work on characterizing the electrical properties of cancer cells at the AES (Electrophoresis Society) Annual Meeting, which was a part of the AiCHE Annual Meeting. One electrokinetic technique (dielectrophoresis) may be used to enhance capture of cancer cells from a suspension containing contaminating blood cells. This technique, however, relies on a good model of the electrical properties of cancer cells. It is possible that these electrical properties of cancer cells change when cells gain resistance to chemotherapy or when they’re exposed to or deprived of certain stimuli in circulation. I used electrorotation (a technique related to dielectrophoresis), which revealed changes of pancreatic cancer cell lines’ electrical properties in response to such stimuli.

At this meeting, I also had the opportunity to meet leaders in the field of electrokinetics. In particular, I enjoyed presentations from and/or conversations with Dr. Amy Herr, Dr. Fatima Labeed, Dr. Mike Hughes, Dr. Adrienne Minerick, Dr. Nathan Swami, Dr. Lisa Flanagan, Dr. Ben Hawkins, and many other investigators and students.

Advertisements

Lannin Presents at 2014 Gordon Research Seminar/Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors

I recently traveled to Newport, RI to attend the Bioanalytical Sensors Gordon Research Seminar (at which I presented a talk and a poster), and the Bioanalytical Sensors Gordon Research Conference (at which I presented a poster). My presentations focused on my recent work on measuring the electrical properties of cancer cells and observing how these properties change in response to stimuli. Such measurements are important for robust, optimal operation of dielectrophoresis-based cell capture devices.

Lannin Attends BMES Annual Conference; Presents Poster on Machine Learning for Identification of CTCs from Images

I recently traveled to Seattle, WA to attend the Biomedical Engineering Society’s Annual Meeting. There, I presented a poster detailing my advancements on machine learning for the automated identification of circulating tumor cells from microscope images. I discussed the advantages of automated cell identification, for example, its consistent output and order of magnitude increase in speed over manual classifications.

Because there were multiple sessions simultaneously, I couldn’t see everything that I wanted. Nonetheless, I attended many good talks. Below are a few that stood out:

 

High-Throughput Partial Wave Spectroscopic Microscopy for Early Cancer Detection

J. E. CHANDLER, H. SUBRAMANIAN, C. D. MANEVAL, C. A. WHITE, AND V. BACKMAN

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

 

Effect of Pseudopodial Extensions on Neutrophil Hydrodynamics and Adhesion Binding

A. ROCHELEAU, W. WANG, AND M. KING

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

 

Computational Field-Portable Microscope for On-Chip Imaging of Confluent Samples

A. GREENBAUM, N. AKBARI, AND A. OZCAN

Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA,

Bioengineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA

 

Low-Voltage Electroosmotic Flow and DNA Shearing Using Ultrathin Nanoporous Silicon Membranes

T. GABORSKI, R. CARTER, J. SNYDER, AND J. MCGRATH

Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY

University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

 

A micro-Hall Chip for Sensitive Detection of Bacteria

D. ISSADORE, R. WEISSLEDER, AND H. LEE

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Massachusetts General Hospital – Center for Systems Biology, Boston, MA

 

Nanoscale Roughness and Surface Charge Control Selectin-Mediated Adhesion of Malignant and Non-Malignant Cells Under Flow

M. J. MITCHELL, C. A. CASTELLANOS, AND M. R. KING

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

 

Vortex Technology for CTC Extraction From Blood Samples

D. E. GO, E. SOLLIER, J. CHE, R. KULKARNI, AND D. DI CARLO

UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2Vortex Biosciences, Palo Alto, CA

 

Sheathless, On-Chip Flow Cytometer Enabled by Standing Surface Acoustic Waves (SSAW)

Y. CHEN, L. WANG, AND T. J. HUANG

The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA,

Ascent Bio-Nano Technologies, Inc., State College, PA

 

Circulating Tumor Cell Capture Amplification

A. N. HOANG, A. SHAH, T. BARBER, M. PHILLIPS, D. WINOKUR, S. MAHESWARAN, D. A. HABER, S. L. STOTT, AND M. TONER

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA,

Surgical Services and BioMEMS Resource Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA,

Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, MA

 

Many of the posters that I was most interested in were at the same time that I was presenting my own. Nonetheless, I also saw some good posters. Here are some of the impressive ones:

 

The Use of Electrokinetic Phenomena to Characterize Malignant Cells

P. KYLE, L. ANDERS, J. CEMAZAR, C. ROBERTS, E. SCHMELZ, AND R. DAVALOS

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

 

Dielectric Impedimetric Detection Method for Bacterial Biofilm Cultures under Different Growth Conditions.

J. PAREDES, S. BECERRO, AND S. ARANA

CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain

CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragon, Spain

 

Determining the Effect of Fluid Shear Stress on the Elastic Properties of Cancer Cells using a Micropipette Aspiration Technique

V. CHIVUKULA, J. T. NAUSEEF, M. HENRY, K. B. CHANDRAN, AND S. C. VIGMOSTAD

The Universit of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Lannin attended 2013 Gordon Research Conference on Physics and Chemistry of Microfluidics

From June 9-14 I traveled to Tuscany, Italy to present a poster at the Microfluidics GRC. My poster was on the topic of automated identification of GEDI-captured cells from fluorescent microscope images, and I had good discussions with other attendees at the poster session. The rigorous scientific content of the conference, the remoteness of the location, and the informality of the atmosphere promoted frequent opportunities for meaningful interactions with students, post-docs, professors, and industry scientists.

 Leaders in the field gave talks on fluidic control, paper microfluidics, microfluidic acoustics, centrifugally-driven microfluidics, diagnostics, commercialization, and next-gen sequencing, and after each talk, ample time was allotted for discussion. I particularly enjoyed learning about paper microfluidics and centrifugally-driven microfluidics: two technologies with which I have had very little experience before this conference. 

The idea of open-source science came up in discussion, spawning an ongoing debate for the remainder of the conference. For example, proponents discussed how open source could lower the barrier to entry for scientific discovery and increase the rate of discovery. Opponents questioned how credit would be assigned, whether this compromises students’ developing careers, and whether full disclosure discourages formation of startup companies and collaborations with industry.

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

The National Science Foundation recently awarded me a Graduate Research Fellowship, which, in addition to being an academic honor, will support my research for three years. As described in their solicitation:

“The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.”

Under the tenure of this award, I will continue my current work developing an estimation algorithm to classify and enumerate cells captured with our GEDI device and imaged with fluorescent microscopy. I aim for this algorithm to be robust to fluctuations in labeling protocol and statistically rigorous so the algorithm can reject almost overwhelmingly large numbers of contaminating cells.